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Posts Tagged ‘energy-efficiency’

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We at Laurel Park Management aren’t out to save the world. We know that task is a little tall for a rental management company. Like most of you, we’re trying to do our jobs well and support our families. But that doesn’t mean we can’t be conscious of our actions, of their consequences. It doesn’t mean we can’t act responsibly and do our part to lessen our impact on this beautiful part of the world that we are so fortunate to inhabit.

Last week’s post was obviously tongue-in-cheek…The Onion is, after all, a satirical publication. But all good satire is rooted in truth, and the truth is that even as busy as our live sometimes get, there is always time to stop, think, and decide whether the action we are about to take is truly the right one.

LPM does what it can to support green living. We use long life CFLs, energy-efficient appliances, low-VOC paints, and low-flow faucets. We offer a recycling program with incentives. We reuse historic buildings rather than knocking them down to build new ones. We support a bikeable, walkable, urban village style of living. None of these things are terribly difficult, and all make a difference. What we’ve found is that green living is really just about consciousness. If we choose to pay a bit more attention and to educate ourselves, even a little, our lives become a bit greener.

So, to remind ourselves and to help those newer to the green movement, here are some easy ways to Go Green (borrowed from Treehugger):

Top Back to Basics Tips

 

 

  • Transport Having got a little reading under your belt, you’re probably itching to get started. One of the biggest impacts we have on the planet is a direct result of the way we move ourselves around. Fortunately, for many of us, this is also easy to do something about. You might consider walking, biking or using mass transit, at least a few days a week. Maybe you can convince your boss to let you work from home? Maybe you can carpool with a friend? If nothing else, you should certainly consider fuel consumption as a major factor in your choice of next vehicle. And when it comes to longer trips, flying is notoriously carbon intensive – so let the train take the strain wherever possible. Find a greener route from A to B with How to Green Your Car, and our Cars and Transportation section.
  • Energy With all the talk of solar panels, fuel cells, building-integrated wind turbines, and flux capacitors, it can be easy to think you need a million bucks to go green at home. Not so. Many of the most effective ways to cut carbon emissions are also the cheapest. Turn lights off when you go out, install energy efficient bulbs and appliances, insulate your home, and keep an eye on consumption. Once you’ve done all that, why not investigate if you can buy green energy from your local utility? Check out our guides on How to Green Your Heating and How to Green Your Electricity for a more detailed plunge.
  • Water This is where the folks in Seattle or the UK start switching off, but stay with us, please! Even if you live in areas of abundant rainfall, water is still a major ecological issue. Clean, drinkable water is precious and needs to be used most efficiently. Every drop of tap water we use also requires energy to filter, purify and transport, and that means fossil fuel emissions. And for those of you in dryer areas, you know only too well that water is becoming an ever-scarcer resource. Fortunately it’s pretty easy to do something about–install water-saving shower heads and aerators, turn the tap off when you’re brushing your teeth, switch to more efficient appliances, or collect rainwater for use in the garden. All this and more can be found in our guide, How to Green Your Water. For those wanting to go a little more hardcore, the Navy Shower, or the “selective flush” are worth a try–if the comments on these posts are anything to go by, you’ll be in good company!
  • Food We’ve all got to eat, and most of us do it every day. It stands to reason that our collective food choices have a huge impact on the planet, and with the global food industry shipping products further and further around the world, and with farming becoming ever more intensive, this impact is only getting bigger. Fortunately, there is a resistance underway. More and more people are getting interested in sustainable food systems. To bring it back to basics, there are four principles that can help guide you to greener meals: eat local, eat seasonal, eat organic, and finally, eat less meat. For a comprehensive guide to a more sustainable diet, check out How to Green Your Meals and the Food and Health category.

Want to read more? Check out the whole article at treehugger.com!

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The City of Sarasota will participate in the international energy conservation effort known as Earth Hour by darkening City Hall, 1565 First Street, and the old Federal Building, 111 S. Orange Ave., Sat., March 27, 2010 from 8:30 pm to 9:30 pm. Decorative lights on the Ringling Bridge and Season of Sculpture along the bayfront also will be extinguished during Earth Hour. Residents are encouraged to participate as well.

The City Commission approved a resolution on March 15, 2010 supporting Earth Hour and encouraging residents and business owners to turn off non-essential lights during the designated one hour. With environmental sustainability as one of its top five priorities, the Commission is committed to combating climate change by reducing the City’s carbon footprint.

Launched in 2007 by the World Wildlife Fund, Earth Hour is a global event which raises awareness about climate change issues. Organizers encourage the public to take actions to increase energy efficiency and decrease carbon emissions. One simple dramatic step is to turn off your lights.

It is estimated 80 million Americans in 318 cities participated in Earth Hour last year. Included in the list of landmarks which were darkened: the Empire State Building, the Golden Gate Bridge, the Space Needle and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis.

Join the City of Sarasota and people around the globe as we turn out the lights for Earth Hour. For more information about the City of Sarasota’s involvement contact Environmental Specialist Alison Albee: 941-365-2200 ext. 6317. See the original release here.

To learn more about Earth Hour visit www.earthhour.org

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Owned and operated by local green builder Devin Rutkowski, LPM manages nearly sixty apartments, cottages, and bungalows in Historic Laurel Park, Downtown Sarasota’s urban village. Our unique properties exude historic charm and feature many green amenities including energy-efficient appliances and lighting, low-VOC paints, and low-flow fixtures. We also offer a recycling program with incentives.

LPM is committed to green living, and encourages you to join us. Laurel Park feels like a quiet residential village, but its proximity to Main Street and Downtown Sarasota enables residents to live virtually car free. Bicycling and walking is not only better for the environment, it’s better for our own health and better for our community. Interested in learning more about green living? Stop by the office and say hello.

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